February 5, 2020/Media, Press

DEVELOPING ICYMI: Texas Secretary of State’s Office Tells Texas Democrats It Will Not Be Able To Report Delegate Count on Election Night

Austin, TX — In a bombshell developing story, the Texas Secretary of State has told officials of the Texas Democratic Party that it will not be able to report delegate totals on election night for the Texas Presidential Primary. [Texas Tribune, February 5, 2020]

Texas Democratic Party Executive Director Manny Garcia issued the following statement:

“The sanctity of the vote is sacred. Patriots have fought, bled, and died to protect the right to vote. Texans deserve to know who won their election. If, in fact, the Secretary of State refuses to report all of the election results, including the presidential preference by senate district, it is a violation of the public trust and fails Texans. This is unacceptable. 

“Texas is more important to presidential campaigns than ever before and could make or break campaigns. With one of the largest delegations, in one of the most diverse states in the country, Texas is the pathway to winning the Democratic nomination. The public deserves to see the vote and the delegate results on election night, and we urge the Texas Secretary of State’s office not to leave Texas voters and our nation in the dark.

“If necessary, the Texas Democratic Party will step up where the Texas Secretary of State has failed. The Texas Democratic Party is currently assessing reporting options, and if we can confidently acquire and report in a timely manner election results by every category necessary to award delegate counts then we will do so. Transparency is our top priority. We will make further comments on our plans in the near future.”

More from the Texas Tribune:

 

  • “Officials with the Texas Democratic Party said they were recently told by the Texas Secretary of State’s office that it will not be able to provide on election night the numbers needed to allocate a majority of the 228 delegates up for grabs in the state on Super Tuesday.”

  • “In a Jan. 23 meeting, the Democrats said, top state election officials cited limitations to their revamped reporting system, which is used to compile returns from the state’s 254 counties.”

  • “They basically said that’s not built out yet,” said Glen Maxey, the special projects director for the Texas Democratic Party who attended the meeting with state officials.

  •  “Maxey said he and other officials were told the state initially will collect election returns at the county level but not at the senatorial district or precinct level, which are needed to calculate how many delegates each candidate picks up.”

  • “A spokesman for the secretary of state did not respond to emailed questions or calls about the issue.”

  • “Unlike in Iowa, Texas will be able to report statewide vote totals in the primary and a Democratic candidate will be named the winner of the overall contest. But with the presidential contest expected to be at fever pitch, the full reporting delay will slow down a final delegate tally in a state representing the second-largest prize on Super Tuesday. Texas is set to award more delegates to Democratic presidential hopefuls on that day than all of the preceding primaries combined.”

  • “In a statement on Wednesday, Manny Garcia, executive director of the Texas Democratic Party, said if the secretary of state’s fails to report promptly the election results by senate district, it will amount to a ‘violation of the public trust.’”

  • “‘Texas is more important to presidential campaigns than ever before and could make or break campaigns. With one of the largest delegations, in one of the most diverse states in the country, Texas is the pathway to winning the Democratic nomination. The public deserves to see the vote and the delegate results on election night, and we urge the Texas Secretary of State’s office not to leave Texas voters and our nation in the dark.’”

  • “For many years, the secretary of state’s office has been the keeper of election night returns. In the 2016 election, for example, the secretary of state asked county officials who administer elections across the state to send in both countywide results for the presidential primary and results by senate district.

  • “‘If we can confidently acquire and report in a timely manner election results by every category necessary to award delegate counts then we will do so,’ Garcia said. ‘Transparency is our top priority. We will make further comments on our plans in the near future.’” 

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